World Mental Health Day

This year for World Mental Health Day, Impact staff shared some of the reasons that it is important to cure stigma. The negative effects of stigma are severe and far reaching. Check out the pictures below to see what some of our staff shared.

 “Stigma keeps us from being at our best.” - John, Impact Clinician

“Stigma keeps us from being at our best.” - John, Impact Clinician

 “It can often prevent someone from asking for help.” -Kristin, Clinical Services Manager

“It can often prevent someone from asking for help.” -Kristin, Clinical Services Manager

 “It’s a barrier to mental health services.” Fallon, Impact Clinician “1 in 4 people will experience a mental health issue each year.” - Toraneka, Impact Clinician

“It’s a barrier to mental health services.” Fallon, Impact Clinician “1 in 4 people will experience a mental health issue each year.” - Toraneka, Impact Clinician

 “Stigma creates oppression.” - Vince, Director of Operations

“Stigma creates oppression.” - Vince, Director of Operations

 “Stigma can trap people in a cycle of illness through isolation, unemployment and lack of treatment.” -Emily

“Stigma can trap people in a cycle of illness through isolation, unemployment and lack of treatment.” -Emily

Back to School

Summer is wrapping up, and many are prepping to get back in the swing of things with school. If the thought of going back to school fills you with dread and anxiety, you’re not alone. If something just doesn’t “feel right” and you aren’t sure why, you may be dealing with a mental health condition. If you’ve dealt with traumatic events in your life, that may be a contributing factor. Did you know that half of all mental health disorders begin by the age of 14, and about 75 percent begin by the age of 24? But it’s also important to know that mental health issues are common and treatable.

Mental Health America (MHA) has also developed tools and resources to help increase your understanding of how traumatic events can trigger mental health concerns. You can learn how to understand trauma’s impact on mental health, and recognize mental health concerns like anxiety, psychosis and depression. While you do not get to choose what happens to you, you do get to choose how you respond. Learn more at mentalhealthamerica.net/back-school. This school year make smart choices about how to deal with difficult or uncomfortable feelings - and learn why your mental health matters.

Just like physical health, taking care of mental health struggles early can help to prevent more serious problems from developing in the future. If you are concerned that you or someone you know may be experiencing a mental health problem, it is important to act before Stage 4. Start the conversation. Seek help from a trusted adult. Remember there is nothing to be ashamed of and that there is help and hope. Don’t know how to start the conversation? MHA has tips and information to help get you started at bit.ly/ tips4talking.

There are also serious signs that someone is in crisis and needs more immediate help. These include thoughts or plans of hurting oneself or another person. If you or someone you know is in crisis call 1-800-273-TALK (8255), text “MHA” to 741741, or call 911.

Kennedy Forum: On the Table

Collaboration in Mental Health Care

On May 8th, 2018 Impact hosted mental health agencies in the Evanston area for a panel discussion on collaboration in mental health care. The panel discussed the importance of collaboration as well as challenges that may arise and ways that we can all work together more effectively.

  From Left to Right: Kristin Johanns LCSW (Impact), Vince Heneghan LPC (Impact), Toraneka Hampton LPC (Impact), Laura Hilb NP (Connections for the Homeless), Anna Sack (Impact), Dr. Michael Solomon MD. (Impact)

From Left to Right: Kristin Johanns LCSW (Impact), Vince Heneghan LPC (Impact), Toraneka Hampton LPC (Impact), Laura Hilb NP (Connections for the Homeless), Anna Sack (Impact), Dr. Michael Solomon MD. (Impact)

National Sleep Awareness Week

The irony isn't lost on us...National Sleep Awareness Week begins the same Sunday as Daylight Savings Time. Perhaps losing an hour of sleep is the most poignant reminder that we all could benefit from a bit more of it. Join Impact as March 11th through the 17th we learn more about the importance of sleep, how it affects mental health and what we all can do to get more of it. 

National
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